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CONSERVATION PROJECTS

204 conservation projects, awards, conferences, PhD students, and schools funded. CLICK HERE FOR OUR FULL LIST OF PROJECTS.

Since 1989, Lubee has been a global leader in bat conservation.  Our passion and dedication is apparent through the diverse areas around the world in which we have conducted and funded research.

Click this interactive map for detailed information.

Lubee Bat Conservancy undertakes and supports fundamental research, conservation, and education programs both in the U.S. and in strategically selected regions around the world where bat diversity is high, endangered species are on the brink of extinction, and community engagement is possible.

While our portfolio of projects is diverse, priority is given to projects that address one or more of seven priority conservation/education challenges: endangered species; bats and the bushmeat crisis; population monitoring; habitat protection; managing bat-human conflict in agriculture; emerging infectious diseases; community education.

Current Projects

 

Native Bat Program - Bat house construction, installation, and wildlife surveys.  To date, Lubee staff have built and installed 133 bat houses spanning GA and FL.

Solomon Islands - Support for Zaira Village and forest protection.  Financial support of Zaira Village community members to attend appeals court hearings to stop logging and protect their forests through paid rangers.

Bougainville (PNG) - Conservation of the Endangered Bougainville Monkey-Faced Bat and the Critically Endangered Greater Monkey-Faced Bat through local community empowerment. Between 2016 and 2021, locals documented at least four roosts and observed four individual Bougainville Monkey-Faced Bats. Additional surveys are currently underway with new roosts being identified.

Rodrigues Island - Education programs, endangered species conservation (Rodrigues fruit bat), population monitoring, community engagement, reforestation, job creation.  The Rodrigues Environmental Education Project (REEP) supports a local educator who works with communities to protect the environment and native wildlife. REEP has led reforestation efforts and field work on the endangered Rodrigues fruit bat. In the 1970’s, only 70 of these bats remained. Today, there are over 20,000, thanks to their efforts.  To view the 2022 REEP annual report, click here.

Kenya - Conservation of the Endangered Hildegarde’s Tomb Bat. This project aims to protect this species and its habitat through community led efforts focused on population monitoring, education, and engagement, while also supporting researchers to attend Red List workshops and conduct species assessments.

Fiji & New Caledonia - Long-term conservation of Fiji & New Caledonia’s threatened and endangered bats.

  • Pacific Sheath-tailed Bat.  Field surveys on Ovalau Island confirmed four current cave roosts with 50 to 250 bats each. Conservation on Taveuni Island was launched at two known cave roosts that were threatened by deforestation and guano mining. Local communities confirmed three additional caves and secured commitments to replant forests around these areas.

  • Fijian Blossom Bat.  On Viti Levu Island, two new cave roosts were identified increasing known roosting locations to seven, guiding further research and protection.

  • Fijian Free-tailed Bat.  The only known roost site on Vanua Levu is now recognized as a protected area and the colony is being monitored by the local community as part of a PhD program.

  • New Caledonia Long-eared Bat.  The species’ last confirmed sighting was May 1991; no roosts are known for the species. While initial surveys in 2021/22 failed to confirm their presence, unknown acoustic calls from the region have yet to be identified and may prove to be this long-lost species. Acoustic surveys did confirm the presence of the Endangered New Caledonia Wattled Bat.

  • New Caledonia Blossom Bat.  The survey team was able to confirm that the colony at Vallée des Roches still exists since it was last visited 12 years ago. The current colony may exceed 700 bats, triple the number from 12 years ago. Additional monitoring and strengthened management are planned, as is an expedition to the only other known roost site.

 

Please note that we are not accepting grants at this time as we are focused on current projects listed above.

OUR PROJECTS ARE POSSIBLE THANKS TO YOU, OUR AMAZING DONORS!  BUT, THERE IS MORE WORK TO DO....A LOT MORE WORK, AND WE NEED YOUR HELP TO SAVE BATS, ENGAGE COMMUNITIES, AND CONTINUE OUR EDUCATION AND AWARENESS CAMPAIGNS. 

 

TO DONATE TO OUR ONGOING EFFORTS PLEASE CLICK HERE. 

YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.  THANK YOU!!

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